Anglican Unscripted Episode 48

Aug 18, 2012 by

Not a week goes by (even in August) when the Unscripted team can't dig up some interesting news. Kevin and George discuss the "new thang" with AMiA and the turmoil at Pawley's Island. They also reveal some Crown Commission secrets, Anglican Job Postings and Affinity Dioceses. Peter Ould talks about an Englishman trying to sell more books and Allan gives some interesting history about leaving and staying in TEC at the same...

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Moving Forward Together Statement

Jan 19, 2012 by

Raleigh, NC    January 18, 2012 On January 16-18, 2012, over 300 laity and clergy, representing 109 churches that have been a part of the Anglican Mission in the Americas, gathered at the Church of the Apostles, Raleigh, NC, for a sacred assembly. The assembly was hosted by Archbishop Onesphore Rwaje and the House of Bishops of the Anglican Province of Rwanda (PEAR), who sent three other bishops (Alexis Bilindabagabo, Laurent Mbanda, Louis Muvunyi) as delegates, and were joined by US bishops Thad Barnum and Terrell Glenn. Archbishop Robert Duncan and Bishop Julian Dobbs of the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) joined the assembly as honored guests.   The assembly was a rich time of worship, prayer, and communion with God. In the traditions of classical Anglicanism and the East African revival, the assembly featured both form and flexibility, which fostered dialogue, reconciliation, healing, and—most importantly—listening to the Lord. A way forward was unclear at the outset of the assembly, but by its conclusion the next steps for moving forward together were evident.   Emphasizing collaborative leadership as an Anglican distinctive, Archbishop Rwaje and the House of Bishops asked Bishops Terrell Glenn and Thad Barnum to create a short-term team to give oversight and care for all clergy and churches that have been a part of the AMiA’s and desire to remain resident in Rwanda. This team is to be characterized by a spirit of openness, collaborating freely with clergy and laity throughout its constituent churches. Its structures are to be temporary and easily dismantled once its task is completed. It will be a team actively connected to the House of Bishops of Rwanda.  This team is charged with:     Care, healing, encouragement and guidance for churches and clergy in all ongoing efforts of mission and ministry, in all things personal, corporate, ecclesial and structural;     Ongoing mobilization and distribution of financial support and guidance for church plants and church planting;     Continuing support for those in process of ordination and those whom God might raise up to join in the work of planting churches and carrying out the work of Christ’s church;     Developing temporary structures necessary to support and accomplish these tasks.   For this task, Bishop Glenn was asked and has agreed to serve as the team’s leader. He will recruit and recommend to Archbishop Rwaje temporary canons and regional leaders who will serve those churches and clergy moving forward together in regional groupings throughout North America. Additionally, as a result of the generous offer of Archbishop Bob Duncan, this team will work freely and collaboratively with partner churches and bishops in ACNA for the support and care of churches and clergy as needed.   Bishop Glenn has appointed the following clergy to serve in this temporary process: the Rev’s Steve Breedlove, David Bryan, Dan Claire, Chip Edgar, Alan Hawkins, Clark Lowenfield and Ken Ross. Others may be added in the weeks ahead as needed structures come into focus.   For the duration of its...

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Communique from Archbishop Eliud Wabukala on the reconciliation meeting between the Anglican Church of Rwanda and AMIA...

Jan 18, 2012 by

On Wednesday January 4th, 2012 a reconciliation meeting was in Nairobi, Kenya, held between the leaders of the Anglican Mission in America (AMiA) and the Province of the Anglican Church of Rwanda (PEAR) at the invitation of the Most Rev'd Dr. Eliud Wabukala, Archbishop of the Anglican Church of Kenya (ACK) and Chairman of the Primates Council of the Global Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (GAFCON/FCA) Present were the Most Rev'd Dr. Eliud Wabukala (ACK), the Most Rev'd Onesphore Rwage (PEAR), the Rt. Rev'd Lauren Mbanda (PEAR), the Rt. Rev'd Chuck Murphy (AMiA) and the Rt. Rev'd John Miller (AMiA). Also present were the Most Rev'd Ikechi Nwosu (Church of Nigeria), the Rt. Rev'd Joseph Kanuku rACK), the Rt. Rev'd Timothy Ranji (ACK), the Rt. Rev'd Julius Kalu (ACK) and the Rt. Rev'd Dr. Gideon Githiga (ACK). The Chairman made it clear that while there had been a painful and very public breakdown in the relationship between the leadership of the Anglican Mission in America and the Anglican Church of Rwanda he was confident that by God's grace reconciliation could be achieved and harmony restored. He invited both sides to present their concerns openly and urged all present to listen prayerfully. Bishop Chuck Murphy began by expressing his profound regret for the broken relationship and stressed his commitment to lead AMiA as a single-minded mission agency. He was deeply distressed by the public accusations made against him but remains determined to fulfill the mandate that had been given to him and Bishop John Rodgers when they were consecrated in Singapore in January 2000, by Archbishops Kolini and Tay.   Archbishop Onesphore Rwage also acknowledged his deep distress at the broken relationships since he counted Bishop Murphy to be a friend of many years. He also expressed his appreciation for the amazing work that has been accomplished by the AMiA. His concerns were focused on the confusion brought about by the continuing role of the former Archbishop, the lack of financial transparency and the recently announced plans to separate from the Church of Rwanda and function independently without adequate prayer or consultation. After a lengthy discussion between all parties, including those present as observers, the following points were agreed to :   1. They were all resolved that forgiveness should come from both sides of the divide. 2. The founding Fathers (Archbishops Kolini, Young and Tay) should work together with the incumbent Archbishop of Rwanda with the former acknowledging the ecclesiastical authority of the latter. 3. The Church of Rwanda agreed to stop looking at AMiA's mistakes and look forward and walk together for the sake of the Gospel. 4. AMiA agreed that they remain canonically under the Church of Rwanda and accept the doctrine of forgiveness. 5. The Archbishop of Rwanda and Bishop Murphy agreed to start the process of forgiveness with both acknowledging that things went wrong between them. They both agreed that when they start talking together the misunderstandings will be clarified and corrected. 6. AMiA agreed to...

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Anglican Mission Winter Conference Concludes

Jan 18, 2012 by

By Cheryl M Wetzel, Virtueonline The Anglican Mission closed their winter conference Saturday, January 14 in Houston. Amid the context of morning worship, Bishops Phil Jones and TJ Johnson drew summaries for those in attendance from their own times of doubt and uncertainty. The conference theme was the Work of the Holy Spirit. The final encouragement was to embrace the Spirit and follow the work he has already begun. Bishop TJ Johnson compared the current time of troubles in the Anglican Mission with the story of David and Goliath. "David picked up five stones from the river bed and ran across the valley to meet Goliath. We are all going home to meet our own Goliaths." "I have picked up three stones here today, to take home with me: 1) The cause of Christ 2) The Kingdom of God in context of Anglican heritage 3) The Hope of glory "Those are my stones. Rwanda took me in 3 months after leaving TEC. It was 2 years before we heard any official statements from Rwanda. We went from 1 church to 6 and it was a lonely, difficult time. I didn't see it as a garden. I felt it was a wilderness but the Holy Spirit began to prepare me, just as surely as he preparing you. He began to build into me those things that are unshakable truths. He was preparing me not for that day but this day. These last two months. This time of doubt and uncertainty. "So I want to leave you with this: do not avoid the wilderness. If you are in a wilderness, the Word of God will come to you. He empowers, transforms and enables. That is where we are and I have great expectations." The challenge of wrapping up the conference fell to Bishop Phil Jones. He concentrated on the Magi who traveled to an unknown destination, following the star of Bethlehem. In Jerusalem, they met with Herod and after that meeting, found the baby Jesus. They determined to go home a different way, not back to Herod as promised. "The Magi didn't understand everything, especially when they started the journey, but they wanted to be a part of what was happening. That's what the Anglican Mission is all about. We don't understand everything, but we want to be a part of whatever God is doing here in the US, right now," Jones declared. Read...

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AMiA winter conference

Jan 15, 2012 by

by Cherie Wetzel, Anglicans United Not the demise it was reported to be I am at the Anglican Mission Winter Conference in Houston, TX. The conference started Wednesday night, and I arrived Thursday at noon. The first thing I noticed when I walked through the corridors was young people. Young men and women in their 20’s and 30’s. Gathered loosely in small groups, the animated discussions were refreshing to see and hear. This is not your average TEC conference with gray haired people dominating the landscape. This is the church we have heard about via the Wall Street Journal and USA Today. Young singles and married couples that supposedly only go to non-denominational churches – you know: no prayer books, no hymnals, no organ, no “dead white man” music. Everything is on the screen or the wall and the band is terrific. Authority? No thanks. What don’t you older folks understand about the word non-denominational? When you speak with the young people here and ask them about their church history, you hear about their prior years in the non-denominational church – or no church at all – and their desire for something more. Something bigger. Something with history. Even something with authority figures. In their searching, they found Anglicanism. The ordered service, the concentration on the reading of and explanation of Scripture. Their commitment to mission, both foreign and local. The emphasis on Jesus: his life, and his ministry and by connection, your ministry. It isn’t naïve expectation, it’s a real desire to find something beyond a job; something that can impact your life and improve it. Read here Read also: Bishops discussion on Thursday’s group...

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Bishop Murphy Answers Questions about AMIA Split

Jan 14, 2012 by

By David Virtue, VOL Virtueonline interviewed AMIA Chairman and Bishop of the Anglican Mission in the Americas, the Rt. Rev. Charles "Chuck" Murphy III, about the split, how he is handling it, and what he thinks the outcome will be. VOL:How much of the $46 million raised by the AMIA and spent over the last 11-12 years went to Rwanda? Murphy:We sent them $5,078,000 not counting other pass through gifts totaling several million more. VOL:To date how many parishes have left AMIA for the pull away group? Murphy:To date, I only know of 4-5 congregations. I suspect by the end of the day, it could be 20-25 congregations, which include the Apostles Mission, networks and congregation in the Birmingham Alabama network. We will know more next week. For these to leave, they will need a process to disaffiliate. VOL: You talked in your message about the pain and hurt you have felt, do you have a sense of betrayal by people who you thought were your friends? Murphy:I am genuinely surprised, but I want them to do what the Lord is calling them to do. Read...

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