Longer trading hours on Sundays undermine family life

Jul 14, 2015 by

By Michael Andreyev, The Conservative Woman: “There is still a growing appetite for shopping on a Sunday.” In those words, George Osborne breezily explains why the Sunday trading laws will be relaxed. He will allow local authorities to extend Sunday trading hours.  Why keep Sunday special?  A day of rest is part of God’s plan for all people.  It is part of what is best for mankind.  A day in the week when almost everybody is free from work is an important way to help family life and relationships flourish, by giving people time to spend together.  God cares for those with low incomes and little influence.  A day in the week largely free from commercial activity is especially valuable to those who would otherwise risk unfair treatment by their employers. The economic effects of extended Sunday trading may improve market share but there are downsides too.  There is no extra money to be spent. Longer opening hours means costs go up.  Longer opening hours further damage family life.  People are taken out of their homes on the one day when the rest of the family are likely to be there. Families of shopworkers will suffer disproportionately.  Residents near shopping centres lose more peace and quiet. Read here Read also:  Secular Europe forces Orthodox Greece to roll out Sunday trading by Archbishop...

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More Sunday trading? (updated regularly)

Jul 8, 2015 by

Tim Montgomerie   writes in The Times July 8 that the economy might gain from extended Sunday shopping hours but asks what will society lose: people will be yanked away from the Sunday dinner table to work a full day at a faraway shopping store? He claims that “ we’ve become an increasingly materialistic society that knows the economic value of everything but barely tries to measure the strength — or weakness — of community life. We measure progress by the percentage of the population that participates in the workforce — but we are blind to the impact of an open-all-hours economy on child welfare or the loneliness of the elderly. “Conservative plans to further liberalise Sunday trading ….. amount to another attack on the community-building idea of shared rest. “It’s the poor who suffer most from our failure to put limits on market power. The social scientist Robert D Putnam suggests that the rise in economic inequality in nations such as America owes a great deal to the quality of adult relationships in many young lives. In his new book, Our Kids, he documents how the decline of shared social activities such as the family mealtime have left children without the kind of social capital that helps them to thrive. “ …. The Conservative party’s purpose is in its name. It should set limits to both the market and the state. It must conserve the people-sized institutions that underpin capitalism whenever it can and which are at the heart of the good life” Read here (£) Read also: Analysis from BBC news Osborne’s Sunday trading policy is an anti-family plan by Paul Goodman, Conservative Home Osborne’s Sunday trading proposals put markets above family and community by Gillan Scott, Cranmer Longer trading hours on Sundays undermine family life, By Michael Andreyev, The Conservative Woman If there’s nothing special about Sundays, we’ll all just feel like gerbils on a wheel, By Quentin Letts, Mailonline They didn’t think it through, by David Keen Church: keep Sunday special for the sake of family, friends and football, by John Bingham, Telegraph Sunday shopping risks depriving us of something precious, by Bishop Michael Nazir- Ali, Daily Telegraph Sunday trading law “will damage fabric of society”, by John Bingham and Edward Malnick, Telegraph...

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Immigration reviving Christianity in Britain – Cardinal

Jul 8, 2015 by

By John Bingham, Telegraph: New migrants brining fresh life to ‘weary western culture’ insists Britain’s most senior Catholic cleric. Cardinal Vincent Nichols said an influx of new arrivals was not simply boosting flagging congregations but encouraging the British-born population to rediscover its own “wellsprings of faith”. He argued that the recent waves of immigration, which have seen the population grow at its fastest rate since records began, would ultimately help strengthen social cohesion, rather than weakening it, because of the ability of faith to bring people of different backgrounds together. He added that the promotion of so-called “British values” – a key strand of the Government’s drive against extremism – was to too shallow in itself to hold society together. His comments came as the Catholic Church in England and Wales prepares for a major new drive to spread its message. Every parish in the country is to set up an “evangelisation” team and devise new strategies to spread the Christian message in the 21st century. Catholics are being urged to learn from the global success of the Alpha course, the short introduction to Christianity devised by Holy Trinity Brompton, an Anglican parish in London, which has been used by at least 15 million people around the world. Read here...

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Young people more conservative than parents’ generation

Jul 3, 2015 by

By Oliver Lane, Breitbart: A new study suggests young women are three times more likely to agree with the statement a “woman’s place is the home” than those over the age of 30, as a growing body of evidence points to the most conservative young generation in decades. The research shows the reactions to various statements and concepts by mothers aged under and above thirty, and the results may surprise you. Although the Daily Telegraph’s new ‘Women’ (or rather, drearily feminist) section reacted to the news with undisguised contempt, it transpires young women are increasingly willing to take on traditional gender roles, are house proud and are less likely to express interest in certain progressive agendas. Although far off a full majority, the number of women who think a “woman’s place is the home” appears to be growing, with around one fifth of under-30’s agreeing, compared to just six per cent of over-30’s. The rise in women rejecting the principles of feminism, as typified by the young people who write blogs such as Women Against Feminism is also illustrated in the study findings which found only half of young women said they were striving for “equality for all”, compared to two thirds of over-30’s. Netmums founder and poll commissioner Siobhan Freegard interpreted the results as reflecting a revulsion by young people at the lifestyle necessary for the ‘have it all mum’ created by the Feminist movement, who endured the triple burden of keeping a home, caring for children, and working a full-time job. She said: Read here...

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The Ten Commandments provide spiritual and moral rules for life

Jun 21, 2015 by

By Julian Mann, The Conservative Woman: If the man or woman in the street were asked to come up with a new set of Ten Commandments to suit modern society, what do you think people might come up with? Thou shalt not insist that the god you believe in is the only god. Thou shalt not be old-fashioned in your attitudes, particularly about marriage and family life. Thou shalt be non-judgmental towards everyone except bigots. Thou shalt live thy dream. Thou shalt own a smart phone. Thou shalt be cool. No doubt you could think of some others that people today might come up with. We’ve seen so far in our series on the Ten Commandments that these good rules for life have their origin in the God who has acted to save his people. These are God’s commands, spoken by the one true God who created the universe and who rules it. “God spoke all these words” to his people Israel through his servant Moses, the book of Exodus tells us as it introduces God’s commands for his people, the people God had lovingly and miraculously rescued from slavery in Egypt. The Lord God rescued his people and then gave them his rules, his rules for life in the Promised Land he was going to give them. God saved his people first and then gave them his rules. That’s important because it shows that God’s people did not earn the right to be his people. Their privileged status as God’s chosen people was God’s gift to them, God’s loving gift to the people he had chosen to save. And we have also seen that when we as Christians view God’s Ten Commandments through the prism of the gospel, through the lens of the fullness of the revelation that we have received in our Lord Jesus Christ, they function in three ways for us. Read here...

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Sixties liberalism swept away our shared sense of decency

Jun 7, 2015 by

By Charles Moore, Telegraph: A crass, ‘anything goes’ culture is as stupid and pernicious as a prudish and repressive one. Like the Women’s Institute, Jeremy Hutchinson, QC, is 100 years old this year. He was the most brilliant criminal counsel of his generation, particularly good at defending people – Christine Keeler; the pro-Soviet spy George Blake; and Charlie Wilson, one of the Great Train Robbers. Lord Hutchinson is distinguished for his role in advancing cultural liberalism. He successfully defended Penguin Books on charges of obscenity when they published Lady Chatterley’s Lover in 1960, and did similar work for the film Last Tango in Paris and the play The Romans in Britain. A book has appeared to mark Hutchinson’s century (Jeremy Hutchinson’s Case Histories, by Thomas Grant, published by John Murray). It paints an attractive picture of a life honourably and enjoyably lived. Naturally, it supports the argument that we are a more civilised society today because of the battles which people like Hutchinson fought and won. In some ways, this must be right. People like Hutchinson stand for liberty rather than state power, and for the jury system and the rule of “live and let live”. There has always been an unpleasant streak in the British character which likes punishing people, and until the Sixties this was dominant in the judiciary. The Hutchinsons of the legal world fought for the quality of mercy, and mostly prevailed. It is also shocking to think how readily books and films could be banned. Partly because of technological change, partly because of greater tolerance, it is now unlikely that a free country would try to suppress a book by law. Even if it did try, it would not succeed for long. But it does not follow that the post-Sixties society created by all this change is liberal in the good sense of that word – open-minded, generous, freedom-loving. There is a real cultural and social ugliness. Read...

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