The Inequality Act: Weaponizing Same-Sex Marriage

Sep 4, 2015 by

by  Matthew Kacsmaryk, Public Discourse: If enacted, the deceptively titled Equality Act would punish dissenters, giving no quarter to Americans who continue to believe that marriage and sexual relations are reserved to the union of one man and one woman. On June 26, five justices of the Supreme Court found an unwritten “fundamental right” to same-sex marriage hiding in the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment—a secret knowledge so cleverly concealed in the nineteenth-century amendment that it took almost 150 years to find. Facebook and the White House were awash in rainbow flags proclaiming the arrival of “marriage equality.” Just three weeks after Obergefell, congressional Democrats filed House (H.R. 3185) and Senate (S. 1858) versions of the “Equality Act,” seeking to add “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the protected classes listed in the federal code. Americans are on an “equality” roll. What could go wrong? Read here...

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Short, sharp and to the point

Sep 3, 2015 by

by Michael Cook, MercatorNet: I thought that a debate on same-sex marriage which allowed only two-minute speeches and two-minute rebuttals would be absurd. Well, I was wrong. After listening to the head of Australian Marriage Equality, Rodney Croome, debate the head of the Australian Marriage Forum, David van Gend, on radio earlier this week, I’d have to say that the arguments on both sides emerged very clearly. Both Croome and Dr van Gend (an occasional MercatorNet contributor) are old hands, so they presented their best arguments succinctly and dispassionately. The presenter on ABC Radio Hobart also posed four questions to the pair. There were no tricks; they were predictable and sensible, the queries that always pop up in all discussions of same-sex marriage. So who won? In my estimation, Rodney Croome’s argument seemed to be: “marriage is all about love and acceptance”. If that is his best shot, David van Gend’s insistence that children need a mother and a father won, hands down. But judge for yourself. Listen here (Excellent! Ed)...

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The Marriage Gap between rich and poor widens

Sep 2, 2015 by

From The Marriage Foundation: Marriage Foundation continues its research on family stability and the marriage gap. Our latest reports co-authored with University of Lincoln Professor Stephen McKay show that the marriage gap between rich and poor continues to widen. Furthermore, the trend away from marriage seems to be spreading to families on middle income. Our new analysis of data from the Family Resources Survey (FRS) reveals that, among mothers with children under five, 87% of those in higher income groups are married compared to just 24% of those in lower income groups. These findings reveal that most better-off families get married, giving themselves the best chance of remaining stable, intact, and better-off. In sharp contrast, most worse-off families do not get married, thereby increasing their risk of not staying together and remaining worse-off. The data also shows a steep decline in the marriage rate among the middle classes. Whereas the vast majority – 84% – of middle earning families with young children were still marrying in 1994, only 59% were married in 2012, a fall of 25% over 18 years. Read here...

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Truth Overruled

Sep 2, 2015 by

By Carolyn Moynihan, MercatorNet: A row broke out in a Kentucky county courthouse yesterday when a clerk refused to issue marriage licences to two same-sex couples. When one of the parties demanded to know under whose authority Kim Davis was acting, she said, “Under God’s authority.” “To issue a marriage license which conflicts with God’s definition of marriage, with my name affixed to the certificate, would violate my conscience,” she said. “It is not a light issue for me. It is a Heaven or Hell decision. For me it is a decision of obedience. I have no animosity toward anyone and harbor no ill will. To me this has never been a gay or lesbian issue. It is about marriage and God’s word.” This episode is only the beginning of a bigger drama for Davis, who has legal proceedings against her, although she is by no means unsupported in her defiance of the US Supreme Court’s decision to impose a new concept of marriage on the whole country. At the same time it illustrates how conscientious stands against same-sex marriage are likely to multiply as a result of the decision in Obergefell v. Hodges. This anticipated consequence of the Roe v. Wade of same-sex marriage is one of two main themes presented in Ryan T. Anderson’s new book, Truth Overruled: The Future of Marriage and Religious Freedom, which – also this week — became available in hard copy from the US. I got my copy last week in New Zealand, where Anderson, as part of an Australasian trip, addressed a family forum in Auckland. Anderson is a great speaker, clear as a bell, even when talking about deep philosophical issues like the nature of marriage, which few of us had to think about until quite recently. He is also a great writer, as anyone who has followed his articles from the Heritage Foundation’s news service (and in many other publications) will know. Read here...

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What’s Driving the Marriage Divide?

Sep 1, 2015 by

By Rachel Sheffield, Public Discourse: Although economic factors certainly play a role in the growing gap in marriage rates between higher income, college-educated Americans and those with lower levels of education and income, the impact of changing cultural mores should not be underestimated. There is a growing marriage divide in the United States. Marriage rates among lower-income and working class Americans have declined dramatically, and unwed childbearing has become the norm. However, among college-educated Americans, marriage is doing pretty well: most marry, their unwed childbearing rate has remained nearly as low as it was five decades ago, and they are the least likely to divorce. This marriage divide is driving a wedge through society: in the upper-income third of the population, children are raised by their married parents, who have college educations. In the rest of the population, children are often born to single mothers with a high school education or less. Unwed childbearing has long been common among those with the lowest income levels. Only recently has it become the norm among working-class, high-school-educated Americans as well. Not only does this trend leave a large proportion of America’s children at much higher risk of poverty, it also puts children at greater risk for outcomes that make them less likely to thrive. Children raised without their married mother and father are more likely to drop out of high school, go to jail, abuse alcohol and drugs, and become single parents themselves. Read here...

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‘Liberal elite’ accused of hypocrisy on marriage

Aug 30, 2015 by

by Madeleine Davies, Church Times: A NEW report suggesting that marriage is “alive and well” among the rich, but not the poor, is evidence that the “liberal elite” are hypocrites, a researcher said this week. “It’s very striking that the liberal elite will happily tell everyone that it does not matter if you marry or not, yet nearly 90 per cent, even today, get married if they have children,” Harry Benson, research director at the Marriage Foundation, said on Tuesday. “They talk a good liberal story, but act in very conservative ways for themselves. . . These modern-day Pharisees tell us how to live our lives, but live their own lives in a completely different way.” The report from the Marriage Foundation, The Marriage Gap, looks at mothers with children under the age of five. In 2012, 87 per cent of mothers with an annual household income of above £45,000 were married. This figure compares with 25 per cent of those with an income of below £14,000. Using data from the Family Resources Survey and the General Household Survey, the report argues that the move away from marriage is spreading from low- to middle-income groups. Read here...

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