How much of the Church of England clergy is female?

Feb 12, 2014 by

By George Arnett, Guardian The Church of England is set to decide on whether to fast-track a vote for women bishops. This process that would bring to a head a debate that has been going on for two decades.   While that has been happening, the make up of the church has been changing quite drastically according to the latest ministry statistics published on the Church of England website. Between 2002 and 2012, the number of female full-time clergy has increased by 41% from 1,262 to 1,781.   Simultaneously, the number of full-time males has dropped from 7,920 to 6,017, meaning women now make up roughly one in five members of full-time clergy (but only one-in-seven of those in incumbent posts such as vicars and priests-in-charge).   Just under half of part-time clergy are women and over half of the 3,148 ministers who support themselves are too.   Read...

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The Doctrine of Male Headship — Why Everyone Should Have One

Jul 4, 2013 by

By John Richardson, The Ugley Vicar “Paul assumes, as do most cultures, that there are significant differences between men and women, differences that go far beyond mere biological and reproductive function. Their relations and roles must therefore be mutually complementary, rather than identical. […] And within marriage, the guideline is clear. The husband is to take the lead – though he is to do so fully minded of the self-sacrificial model which the Messiah has provided. As soon as ‘taking the lead’becomes bullying or arrogant, the whole thing collapses.” So writes N T Wright in the section of Paul for Everyone dealing with the letter to the Ephesians. The reason I quote this is because some of the comments on this blog recently seem to assume that the world divides into two sorts of Christian: those who believe in ‘male headship’ and who are opposed to the ordination of...

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Should the Church be led by opinion poll? Ask the Laodiceans

Mar 14, 2013 by

by Julian Mann If YouGov had conducted an opinion poll asking the members of the church in Laodicea in the late 1st century AD whether they thought they were good Christians, the results would have been overwhelmingly positive. They thought their church was rich in Christian spirituality and commitment and they were very pleased with themselves. But the risen and reigning Lord Jesus Christ, walking among the lampstands of the seven churches in Asia, revealed to the Apostle John his assessment of Laodicean spirituality and it was radically different from that of the congregation: "You say, 'I am rich; I have acquired wealth and do not need a thing.' But you do not realise that you are wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked" (Revelation 3v17 – NIV). This was the spiritually complacent church that, unless it repented, the Lord Jesus was going to spit out of his mouth –...

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Seeking for truth – reflections on the ways in which the decision to ordain women changed the nature of the Church

Feb 2, 2013 by

By Hannah Phillips, New Directions Many years ago when a vote was passed to ordain female priests, I was a teenager. The news had little impact in my convent school, except for Father wandering around muttering under his breath as to how this would change the nature of the Church. Now, I understand what that poor priest (in a school full of girls) was muttering under his breath. The nature of the Church changed on that day and continues to be manipulated by a secular philosophy. Different and complementary No longer is being a ‘woman’ or ‘mother’ seen as being something to desire. In fact most of the time it is portrayed as someone failing to reach their full potential. This is not the image that God desired when he sent an Angel to an innocent girl and gave her the gift of carrying the Messiah. Echoed in that...

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Diocese of Blackburn clergy write to the Archbishop of York

Jan 23, 2013 by

From Thinking Anglicans The following press release has been received: 22 January 2013 MEDIA RELEASE: Lancashire clergy write to the Archbishop of York Over fifty clergy from the Diocese of Blackburn have written to the Archbishop of York, urging him to ensure that the next Bishop of Blackburn will be prepared to ordain women as priests, and fully affirm their ministry. The letter was co-ordinated by the Vicar of Lancaster, the Revd Chris Newlands, and has been signed by fifty-five clergy from across the diocese who are keen to see a supporter of women’s ministry appointed as Diocesan Bishop. Mr Newlands said, “Many churches across the diocese have been greatly enriched by the ministry of women, and we believe that to fulfil his calling as a focus of unity, the next Bishop of Blackburn should affirm the ministry of all the priests in the diocese who hold his licence.”...

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Church job prospects

Dec 28, 2012 by

By Karen Soole, Evangelicals Now So many voices are crying out about the ordination of women bishops. Many are expressing their pain at discrimination, their outrage at the sexism inherent in blocking progress, blocking their vocation. Into this fray I want to speak too, but my voice feels weak among all this outrage. I am a natural candidate for ordination. I am a committed Christian who longs to serve Christ with all my energy. I love to teach the Bible, in fact I ache to teach the Bible, to introduce others to the wonders of Christ in the Gospels, to build others up in their knowledge and love of the Lord, to proclaim Christ so that he may be known, and I grieve at the ignorance in this generation of God’s Word. Not only so, but I am available to begin a new career, my family are growing and,...

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