II. Black University Employee Suspended for Objecting to Comparison between Black and Homosexual Discrimination...

May 7, 2008 by

‘Soft "coersion" produces no martyrs to disturb anyone’s conscience, yet it is highly effective in chilling the speech of ordinary people’. Maggie Gallagher, ‘Banned in Boston’, Weekly Standard, May 2006.  ‘There will never be a problem if one keeps clear of where the problem is.’  John Nolland, God, Gays and the Church, February 2008  Crystal Dixon has not kept her head down and her mouth shut – and she is paying dearly for her convictions.  She has a nicely nuanced view and is no homophobe.  But she has the audacity to make statements which the current PC regime in her university considers beyond the pale. Dr Chris Kempling has lost everything in a similar situation up in Canada – for him it could be too late.  However, this is a very current situation with Ms Dixon and she needs your help.  If you do not think this is right please a. pray for her and b. actually do something!  And it does not matter where you call home – President Jacobs needs to know that Ms Dixon has concerned supporters around the globe who are noting his response.    President Dr. Lloyd A. Jacobs University Hall Room 3500 Phone: 419.530.2211 Fax: 419.530.4984 Email: ...

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MPs demand abortion limit is slashed back to 20 weeks in bid to save 2,500 babies every year

May 6, 2008 by

From the Daily Mail MPs will today begin a fight to cut the number of abortions by limiting a woman’s right to have a termination for ‘social reasons’. They claim that up to 2,500 lives a year would be saved if the upper limit for social abortions was reduced from the current-24 weeks to 20. The cross-party group, led by Tory Nadine Dorries, says 200 MPs have pledged to vote with them when the issue goes to Parliament at the end of the month. Today they will launch their ’20 reasons for 20 weeks’ campaign, highlighting the fact that 550 terminations take place every day – more than double the figure when abortion was legalised 40 years ago. Mrs Dorries, a former nurse, said abortion was becoming so commonplace that hundreds of women were using it simply as a form of contraception. "Britain has 200,000 abortions a year, or 550 a day," she said. "That is just too many. We must slow down on abortion. "I respect a woman’s right to choose. But we are close to being the abortion capital of the world and it is now time to adopt a more moderate, common sense approach to abortion. "No one envisaged such a tally when abortion was legalised 40 years ago. There were only 86,000 abortions a year in the early 1970s. Abortion is now being used as a form of contraception. "With an increasing number of babies surviving at 24 weeks or below, we now have the absurd situation where doctors are battling to save premature babies in one part of the hospital and ending life in another part at exactly the same point of gestation." Latest figures show that almost 3,000 abortions were carried out after 20 weeks last year in England and Wales – a 44 per cent increase in a decade. Three-quarters of these were carried out even though the mother or baby’s health was not deemed to be seriously at risk. Mrs Dorries says at least 2,300 lives could be saved if so-called social abortions after 20 weeks were banned.  Read also:  How could anyone look at this photo and deny it’s time to cut the abortion limit? by Amanda Platell As the world’s most premature living baby, Amillia was born in October 2006 at just 21 weeks. And this remarkable child not only confounded medical expectation but her very existence poses a conundrum for all of society. We live in an age in which the chances of survival for a premature baby born before 24 weeks have improved astonishingly. Yet still we cling in Britain to a legal limit of 24 weeks for abortions – a limit that takes no account of recent medical advances and has been in place since 1990.  We have the most liberal abortion laws in the whole of Europe, twice France’s and Germany’s legal limit of 12 weeks, and six weeks more than Sweden and Norway. What can possibly explain the differential? What do these countries know...

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Today MPs vote on free speech amendment to'gay hatred' law

May 6, 2008 by

PLEASE PRAY THAT ATTEMPTS TO OVERTURN THE AMENDMENT WILL BE UNSUCCESSFUL. From The Christian Institute The Government will attempt to overturn the free speech amendment to the ‘homophobic hatred’ offence in the Commons on Tuesday (6 May), official sources say. The amendment was passed in the Lords on Monday 21 April. It makes clear that criticising homosexual practice or urging people to refrain from such conduct will not, in itself, be a crime. If MPs vote to overturn the amendment, the Lords will get another chance to vote on the matter on Wednesday (7 May). The amendment says, "In this Part, for the avoidance of doubt, the discussion or criticism of sexual conduct or practices or the urging of persons to refrain from or modify such conduct or practices shall not be taken of itself to be threatening or intended to stir up hatred." In recent years there have been a number of cases where overzealous police officers have unjustly interfered with the rights of people to express their religious beliefs on sexual ethics. Speaking during the Lords debate in April, Lord Waddington said: "Some might say that the amendment is now so moderate in its terms that it merely states the obvious and is therefore unnecessary, but those who say that are, I fear, closing their eyes to what has really happened in recent years." "When it comes to language touching on matters of sexual orientation, there has already been a load of trouble with the police misapplying the existing Public Order Act. It is our plain duty to try to prevent this continuing to happen," he added. Lord Waddington was supported by Labour Peer, Lord Anderson of Swansea, who said: "I guess that many of us have been impressed by letters from individuals around the country who have been met with overzealous police officers who have caused great anxiety until eventually the individuals have been told that no prosecutions will follow. "Surely, the aim of this quite modest amendment would be to deter such overzealous police officers from causing such anxiety. I believe that this amendment is indeed modest, and I will have no hesitation in supporting it." The Government minister, Lord Hunt of Kings Heath, said the amendment is not necessary: "I want to say at once that I understand the issues that the noble Lord and others have raised; it is described as a chilling effect, this concern that the passage of this legislation would unnecessarily inhibit the absolute right of freedom of speech. "I certainly understand those concerns, but none the less the Government continue to believe strongly that the kind of clarification in the noble Lord’s amendment, which differs from his in Committee, is not necessary."...

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Marriage Debate: How SSM leads to 'special rights'

May 5, 2008 by

From IMAPP I’ve been corresponding with some people who complained to me that people like myself who want to keep the present definition of marriage are abridging their rights. I’ve been responding that same-sex marriage advocates are actually the ones limiting people’s rights. In Boston, if your church has a deeply held moral belief that children need both a mother and a father, and you want to help parents adopt, you are required to either violate your principles or to stop helping children find loving families. That’s what gay "marriage" has wrought in the first state to fall victim to tyrannical judges and selfish gay activists. Virtually everyone agrees that the real victims of the shut-down of the highly praised Catholic adoption service in Boston are poor orphans of color. But the gay community literally doesn’t care. Being celebrated and stroked as "equal" is far more important to them than the welfare of abandoned, abused, and impoverished children. If LGBT people want to help gay parents adopt, I’m all for it. Let them set up their own adoption agencies and heck, give preference to lipstick lesbians and reject all show tune queens. Or let the show tune queens adopt and tell the lipstick lesbians they’re not butch enough. I don’t care. Each group should be allowed to behave consistently with its values as long as they’re not hurting anybody. But no – the gays convinced the government to demand that Catholics either embrace gay and lesbian values they think are wrong, or face civil and criminal penalties if they dare employ Catholic values in bringing a smile to the faces of underprivileged children who have no one to tuck them in at night. And gays squeal when people say they want "special rights." But they do. What’s more special than being able to arrange for a child’s adoption based on your value system – one that happens to be at most one or two generations old, whereas the Catholic Church with its centuries of tradition is forced to violate its principles if it wants to rescue abandoned children. Boy, those Massachusetts gays really sound like admirable people. Let’s throw them a parade! Oh, never mind. They already throw themselves...

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Archbishop Gregory Venables addresses convention in Fort Worth

May 4, 2008 by

From Anglicans United and Latimer Press Ed. Note: This has been a week of great contrast. I spent last Monday with the Presiding Bishop and listened intently to her thoughts about the institutional church. This morning, I sat as a guest in Fort Worth with Archbishop Venables, whom I have met many times before. He spoke with love and clarity about the risen Lord, Jesus Christ, the authority of Scripture and the challenges before all Christians, those within churches and those without. The contrast between the two couldn’t be clearer. Presiding Bishop Jefferts Schori views her role as shaping and leading a people-oriented institution, managing all the details with efficiency and skill. The archbishop is clearly an ambassador of the Lord Jesus Christ, calling people to commit their lives to Him and entrust Him with their future. Polar opposites? No. But as the Archbishop has said, everyone must choose. Read this and be encouraged. Cheryl M. Wetzel] Archbishop Venables to the Gathered Convention in Fort Worth, TX May 3, 2008 After introduction by Bishop Jack Iker, Archbishop Venables began with Scripture, choosing Acts 2: especially verses 36 and 37: where the crowd responds, “Brothers, what shall we do?” These are my notes on his 90-minute presentation. This (scripture) is an example of the first church meeting. When God’s Spirit moves you, it moves you here (pointed to his head) and here (pointed to his heart). In 1969 when I was 20 years old, a friend spent a whole night, until 4:00 am telling me about this man Jesus and his father God. When I woke up the next morning and was waiting for a train, I said, “If you are there, God, I want to know about you.” A paper blew across the platform and landed at my feet. I picked it up and it had the scripture on it that I just read to you. I knew then, August 1969, that I had to accept Christ as Lord and Saviour. He completely changed my life. He is not here on earth as part of an institution. Jesus Christ wants to change your life. That’s what it is all about. In Acts 2, the men replied, “what shall we do?” They didn’t speak to an institution but a body of people who had experienced the Christ. Sometimes you have to belong to an institution just to function, but in that group, we are all following Christ. Identify who in your institution is following Christ. Who believes in him? Seek out those people. People ask me too tell them what books to read for Anglican theology. I tell them the Bible and the Prayer Book. Salvation is about eternal life. That’s why this issue is so important. (Holding his Bible aloft,) There is nothing in here about church rules and regulations. This is not a human battle. It is a battle over Jesus Christ as the Word of God and as the only begotten Son of God. That is one...

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'Gays' shut down discussion of faith

May 4, 2008 by

From World Net Daily  By Bob Unruh   A discussion on religion, homosexuality and therapy that had been scheduled during the American Psychiatric Association’s annual meeting in Washington has been shut down following an attack by a "gay" publication on some of the people planning to participate. The symposium called "Homosexuality and Therapy: The Religion Dimension," had been in the plans for months at the APA convention in Washington, and was to feature advocates for homosexuality including New Hampshire Bishop Gene Robinson of the Episcopal church and was to be moderated by Harvard psychiatrist John Peteet. Others scheduled to be on the podium included Grove City College professor Warren Throckmorton, who has studied related issues intensively, and Rev. Albert Mohler, president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. But the event, scheduled Monday, has been yanked from the schedule, according to the APA, because of the "misinformation and rhetoric" that was circulating about the issue. Peter LaBarbera, of Americans for Truth, said the reaction to a plan to talk "shows the intellectual shallowness of the gay side." "They’re afraid of a debate," he said, noting it wouldn’t be correct to "paint Warren Throckmorton as the religious right." "The gay activists don’t want to admit ex-gays exist, when they clearly do," he said. The attack was launched by the Gay City News publication, which on April 24 denigrated Throckmorton as "a psychologist without state board certification and an advocate for ‘sexual identity therapy’,” and quoted opponents calling him a "spin doctor of the ex-gay myth." The article quoted those warning of the symposium’s "potential harm." The APA statement on the cancellation said the organizer "decided to withdraw because a key participant who would have brought balance to the discussion had withdrawn. In addition, misinformation and rhetoric surrounding this event had risen to a level that would hinder the kind of open dialogue and interaction that was originally anticipated." Throckmorton, on his own blog, expressed doubt. "What a difference a day makes," he wrote. "The American Psychiatric Association program Homosexuality and Therapy: The Religious Dimension has been pulled by chair David Scasta. My understanding is that he was asked (by whom, I am still not clear) to pull the program because of increasing concerns about it. I am still hearing more about the reasons and hope to know something more clearly soon. "Dr. Scasta did tell me that the APA’s position is that the program was not pulled because gay activists were unhappy with it. At this moment, I am skeptical," he said. Throckmorton had written just a day earlier when Robinson had announced his own sudden withdrawal from the event: "Bishop Robinson provided the following explanation," Throckmorton wrote. "’Conservatives, particularly Focus on the Family, were going to use this event to draw credibility to the so-called reparative therapy movement,’ Robinson told the Blade. ‘It became clear to me in the last couple of weeks that just my showing up and letting this event happen … lends credibility to that so-called therapy.’"...

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